Saturday, August 27, 2016

A third of Texas teachers must work second jobs, survey says

Not good. -Angela


A third of Texas teachers must work second jobs, survey says






Nearly a third of Texas teachers work a second job during the school year “to support themselves and their families,” according to a survey by the Texas State Teachers Association.
The teachers group, an affiliate of the National Education Association, had commissioned a survey of 837 of about 60,000 of its total teacher membership over the summer and released the results Thursday.
The survey found that in addition to moonlighting, teachers spend an average of 17 hours per week outside of the classtime grading papers, preparing lessons and performing other teacher-related duties.
“Although the weekend gives students a break from their classes and time to relax with their families, for many teachers Saturdays and Sundays are spent working at extra jobs and preparing for next week’s teaching duties,” said the group’s president Noel Candelaria.
Texas ranks 26th in teacher pay, according to 2015-2016 data from the National Education Association. Texas teachers receive an average salary of $51,758, $6,306 below the national average. State education funding is $2,700 per student below the national average.
Teachers who responded to the survey added that they spent an average $656 per year of their own money for classroom supplies and an average $326 per month on health insurance premiums.
The state teacher’s group noted that lawmakers haven’t increased the $75 monthly contribution the state makes to teacher insurance premiums in almost 15 years.
The survey also found that:
  • 86 percent of moonlighting teachers said they wanted to quit their extra jobs but would need a pay raise of about $9,000 to do so.
  • 49 percent of teachers work jobs over the summer
  • 53 percent were seriously considering leaving the teaching profession
  • 95 percent opposed using a single test to determine whether students should move on to the next grade. Fifth and eighth graders in Texas must pass state standardized tests for grade promotion

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