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Sunday, January 22, 2017

My reflection from yesterday's Women's March on Austin—January 21, 2017

Women's march in Austin, Texas - Saturday, January 21, 2017

Here's my reflection from yesterday's march 

that I shared with friends:


Me and my family at yesterday's march.

I did a Women's march and bought some 

flowers today. And the weather was 

spectacular and made for a healthy, 
community-building, space for engaging 
one another. 

The peaceful coming together of so many 

tens of thousands of people to such a 
beautiful thing to behold... 

A march...a women's march.
Mujeres! Primas, sobrinas, amigas, e hijas. 
Nos gozamos mucho.

One knows the merits of a movement, any movement or mobilization, by the effects 
that it has on the individuals that are a part of it. So I felt peaceful. I felt joyful. Peace and blessings to all of us. Truly.
Let us not lose sight of the prize. Let's not let ego or privilege rule. Let's re-invent this
system from the grassroots up. Grassroots democracy, our roots as a country. And as 
peoples that are native to this continent.
I sure hope people are feeling it this way. At least in my
circles, there is a great deal of positive energy and 
excitement.

We do have to "win" this one. But it's far, far more than
that. It's also simultaneously a defining moment and a 
moment of defining, strategizing, and financing a different 
values orientation, a different way of living and being in the 
world.
Let's be done away with the managerial approaches, particularly the most regimented
ones. Regardless, let's embrace democracy and the democratic process. Let's 
re-discover them to their fullest potential. Let's turn this narrative on its head.

And may a good spirit, nourished by positive intentions, coupled with a passion for social
justice, work to guide us as we build a new world out of the embers of "disaster capitalism."

OK, back to my flowers.
*****
Here's a resource for information on Twitter How To Follow & Support 
The Women's March Online

*****
And here's another guide written by former congressional staffers on the topic of best
practices for making Congress listen titledINDIVISIBLE:  A PRACTICAL GUIDE FOR 
RESISTING THE TRUMP AGENDA

*****

Here is another resource from my blog, as well, for 

combatting the Trump agenda against our immigrant, 

especially undocumented, community.  

 I Am an Unafraid Educator. Join the Campaign!



To all of this, I'll add a couple of pertinent news stories and 
urge folks to stay close to this blog and my Twitter account @vlnzl as we have 
significant battles this legislative session in Texas. I also have a good number of 
students writing policy briefs and portfolios this session and they're looking for 
offices and/or organizations to work with.  Please let me know ASAP if you have 
use of one of our enormously talented students to work on legislation, most especially 
related to education policy.

Sí se puede! Yes we can!

Angela Valenzuela
c/s

From today's Austin American-Statesman:  Anti-Trump protesters take to the streets after election          

Women’s March Is The Biggest Protest In US History As An Estimated 2.9 Million March

Millions of Americans have taken to the streets from New York to Los Angeles and everywhere in between as the Women's Marches on Washington is estimated to be the biggest one-day protest in US history.







Women’s March Is The Biggest Protest In US History As An Estimated 2.9 Million March
Millions of Americans have taken to the streets from New York to Los Angeles and everywhere in between as the Women’s Marches on Washington is estimated to be the biggest one-day protest in US history.
UConn professor Jeremy Pressman is keeping a running total of crowd estimates across the United States in a Google document.
An estimated 60,000 people marched in Atlanta. 250,000 are marching in Chicago. There are estimates of 250,000 people in Boston, and 200,000 more in Denver. In New York, the estimate ranges from 200,000-500,000. City officials estimate that 500,000 people participated in the main march in Washington, DC. In Los Angeles, the estimate is anywhere from 200,000-750,000.
There were also protests of 60,000 in Oakland, CA, 50,000 in Philadelphia, 100,000 in Madison, WI, 20,000 in Pittsburgh, 20,000 in Nashville, TN, and 60,000 in St. Paul, MN.
1982’s anti-nuclear march in New York City drew an estimated crowd of 1 million. The 1963 Civil Rights March on Washington drew 250,000. 1969 anti-Vietnam war march in Washington was attended by an estimated 500,000-600,000. 1995’s Million Man March was attended by 400,000-1.1 million. In 1993, the LGBT March for equal rights had a crowd of 800,00-1 million.
There has never been anything in US history like the Women’s March. It is nationwide, and proof that the American people are not going accept the agenda of the Trump administration without a serious fight.

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